Easy Dynamically Resized Background Images with Backstretch

Ever wanted fullscreen background images for a website? Backstretch by Scott Robbin is a jQuery plugin which makes this really easy, as takes care of dynamic resizing and positioning your image:

$.backstretch('images/background.jpg');

The same also works for any block element:

$('#somediv').backstretch('images/background.jpg');

Even slideshows are possible:

  $.backstretch(['images/first.jpg', "images/second.jpg', 'images/third.jpg'],
                {duration: 3000, fade: 750});

Just try out and have fun!

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A Tiny Static Webserver with Node.js and Connect

800px-Dell_PowerEdge_Servers

As I followed the Processing.js tutorial using Chrome, I ran into unsuspected troubles: Chrome blocks local files from beeing loaded to improve your security. You could run chrome via command line, allowing this explicitly, using chrome.exe --allow-file-access-from-files.

But there’s another way which is clearer and more similar to a production environment: Use a static webserver to serve your files to localhost.

First, install Node.js.

Second, install Connect using npm:

npm install connect

Now create your webserver (let’s call it “server.js”):

var connect = require('connect');
 
connect()
 .use(connect.static(__dirname + '/public'))
 .listen(80);

Run you server with

node webserver.js

and access your data using

http://localhost/<yourdata>
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How to Create Secure Passwords That are Easy to Remember

password_strength

We all share the same problems with passwords: They should not only be secure, but also easy to remember. However, most passwords are either insecure (like Pa$$word oder letmein) or hard to remember (like sk3Oh$d!). For a secure password only the the number of possible combinations matters. What in most cases does not matter is how long a password is. And that’s where the system suggested by Randall Munroe starts: Instead of getting most combinations out of a few characters, he uses some more letters (in his example, four words) one can easily remember (if only because the combination is so weired) to achieve a large number of combinations:

Randall Munroe's suggestion for easy to secure, easy to remember passwords.
Randall Munroe’s suggestion for easy to secure, easy to remember passwords.

 

 

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